Frequently Asked Questions About Walking the Vía de la Plata

Updated April 2021

My name is Gerald Kelly. I'm the author of several guides to and books about the Caminos de Santiago. I've been walking Caminos since 2004 and have accumulated over 13,000km of walking (or about 500 days).

The opinions given below are my own. I've walked the Vía in its entirity three times and have walked parts of it on many other occasions since 2011.

The Walking Guide to the Vía de la Plata

This FAQ is an accompaniment to the Walking Guide to the Vía de la Plata.

I started writing this guide shortly after the first time I walked from Seville to Mérida in the winter of 2011. At that time there was no up-to-date guide in English and very little information on the internet.

The guide is now available as a PDF download, as a printed book from Ivar's Camino shop and Amazon, and as an app for Android and iPhone (soon to be upgraded to an entirely new version).

Links to where to get the guide are available from here.

This FAQ covers the things you need to know before you walk the Vía, it does not describe the route itself, for that you need to download the guide.

Please note: this page is a WORK IN PROGRESS. If you have any suggestions for other topics to cover or for improving the information please contact me from the Contacts Page.

Our Facebook Group is a good place for any additional questions you may have.

Table of Contents

About the Vía de la Plata

What is the current situation in Spain as regards COVID-19?

What needs to happen so we can walk the Vía again?

Restrictions on entering Spain

To summarise COVID-19...

How well marked is the Vía? Are the yellow arrows easy to follow?

What are the distances you have to walk every day?

Are there lots of places to eat?

Are there pilgrim menus?

I can only manage maximum 20km a day, will I be able to walk the Vía?

Are taxis and public transport easily available?

This is my first Camino / long-distance hike, is the Vía a good first Camino?

Can I just walk the last 100km of the Vía?

How much does it cost to walk the Vía de la Plata?

When is the best time to walk?

When is the worse time to walk?

Climate data

Climate zone map

Is there a luggage transfer service along the Vía?

Can I send things I don't need for the walk ahead to Santiago?

Do I need a sleeping bag on the Vía?

I only have two weeks, what's the best part to walk?

Is packing for the Vía different from other Caminos?

How many Pilgrim Hostels (Albergues) are there and what are they like?

Is there accommodation like guest houses and hotels?

During busy periods is it necessary / advisable to book ahead?

Will there be a lot of other pilgrims? When is the busy time?

I want to do the Vía by bicycle, what do I need to know?

Is the Vía safe to walk (from the point-of-view of crime)?

Is the Vía safe for women (from the point-of-view of sexual harrassment and violence)?

Is it worth reporting incidents to the Spanish police?

Are there dangerous animals along the Vía?

Is extreme weather common along the Vía?

Is there or has there been problems with bedbugs on the Vía?

Do I need to speak Spanish?

Do I need a phone?

Do I need a Spanish SIM card or is WiFi widely available?

What are the pros and cons of the two different routes after Granja de Moreuela?

What historic / UNESCO World Heritage sights are there along the Vía?

What are good places to take a rest day?

What about camping on the Vía?

How do I get to Seville?

How do I get to Salamanca?

How do I get to Ourense?

Spanish Trains


Vía Basics

About the Vía de la Plata

The Vía de la Plata starts in Seville and heads north until Granja de Moreruela where it divides, on branch continues north and joins the Camino Frances in Astorga, the other branch turns west and becomes the Camino Sanabres, this continues through southern Galicia and arrives in Santiago de Compostela from the south.

For simpilicty's sake I will refer to these routes as the Vía de la Plata, or just the Vía.

Conditions on the Vía are different from the Camino Frances in the following ways:

- distances between places, accommodation, water sources, cafes, etc. are at times a lot longer.

- it is walked by far fewer pilgrims so you may find yourself alone a lot

- there is little if any pilgrim support services (baggage transfer, taxis, public transport, etc.)

- in the south the weather can be extremely (in fact dangerously) hot in summer

- in Galicia the mountains can be snow-covered in winter

What is the current situation in Spain as regards COVID-19?

Spain was placed in strict national lockdown in March 2020 with only essential services operating. The restrictions began to be lifted in May and were reduced to a minimum over summer 2020. In October rising infections rates led to the reimposition of stricter restrictions. These were eased again over Christmas and then promptly reimposed in the new year in response to another spike in infections.

The situation now (early April 2021) is that these restrictions are being gradually eased throughout Spain.

However, it's important to understand that under Spain's decentralised system of government most decisions about restrictions are made at the regional level (by regional I mean Comunidad Autónoma). This is in recognition of the facts that restrictions need to be tailored to suit local circumstances and that national lockdowns are too blunt an instrument to be effective.

So, each regional government decides and manages the restrictions for the area under its control. Furthermore, within regions restrictions are applied differently to local areas depending on the local rate of infection (local areas means municipalities, ie. towns and villages). That means that in the same region neighbouring towns can have totally different levels of restrictions at the same time, eg. in one town only essential services may be open while in another a few kilometres away most services may be operating (more-or-less) normally.

So the situation can differ not just from region to region but from town to town and even village to village.

There are also some restritions which are imposed at the provincial level. A province in Spain is not the same as a region. Most but not all regions contain several provinces, for example, Extremadura has two provinces, Cáceres in the north and Badajoz in the south.

So, basically, different parts of Spain = different restrictions. If you remember that you've got the most important point.

The possible restrictions include:

- limits to opening hours of businesses

- limits to the number of people who can meet together

- limits to the number of customers in a shop at the same time (usually there'll be a sign on the door, Aforo máximo x)

- curfew

- obligation to wear a mask in public unless you're eating or drinking

- a smoking ban in public places (this one is widely ignored!)

- perimentral restrictions (ie. you can't cross municipal / provincial / regional borders without a valid reason)

- table service in bars (ie. you can't go to the counter to order, the waiter will come to you)

The central government sets a minimum set of restrictions which must be imposed by all regions, currently these are (among others) a curfew from 11pm to 6am and the obligation to wear a mask in public places.

Let's take the current situation in Seville city as an example (based on the restrictions in place starting 19 March 2021): shops and bars are open from morning until 10.30pm at the latest. Then there's a curfew from 11pm till 6am. You can move within the province of Seville as long as you do not visit any municipalities which have a perimetral restriction (these are imposeed when the local 14-day average of new infections is more than 500 cases per 100,000 of population). Also, you cannot cross provincial borders without a valid reason.

A few weeks ago bars were closing at 6.30pm and we weren't allowed to pass between municipalities without a valid reason. So, as you can see, things have relaxed quite a lot in the last few weeks.

Because restrictions are decided at a local level this tendency towards easing is not happening at the same speed everywhere and, indeed, in some places it is being reversed. For example, the village of Almadén de la Plata, which is on the Vía de la Plata about three days north of Seville, had its restrictions tightened on 19 March, it is now illegal to visit Almadén de la Plata without a valid reason and businesses within the municipality are working reduced hours. This was done as a result of a spike of new infections in the municipality (as calculated by the formula given above). Once imposed tighter restrictions are in place for a minimum of two weeks, after that they may be relaxed if the situation has improved.

In other parts of Spain the situation is similar to Seville (with some small differences). The Vía passes through four regions, eight provinces and countless municipalities, so it's important to keep an eye on local restrictions.

What needs to happen so we can walk the Vía again?

Legal restrictions

Currently the main barrier to walking the Vía is the fact that all regional (ie. Comunidad Autónima) borders are closed to all non-essential travel. The central government announced on 7 April 2021 that the State of Emergency (Estado de Alarma) law will not be renewed when it expires on 9 May. This is the law which allows for restrictions on crossing provincial and regional borders. So from 9 May these restrictions should no longer apply.

However, that does not mean that local restriction will cease to exist. Currently in Sevilla province both Guillena and Almadén de la Plata have their borders closed because of the high infection rates there. Furthermore the government is monitoring national infection rates for a possible post-Easter spike in cases which, depending on its severity, could lead to national restrictions being maintained and the possibility of more local restrictions.

These local restrictions can be worked around because it is allowed to pass through a restricted area, either on foot or by public transport, as long as you don't stop (and I know this doesn't make a lot of sense from the point-of-view of someone walking, this rule was designed with car drivers and users of public transport in mind).

So, at the time of writing the situation remains uncertain. In the next three or four weeks, when the expected post-Easter spike has passed, things should become clearer. At the moment everything depends on the severity of that (and on crazy new variants and on vaccine supplies and on a few other things).

Accommodation

The other issue is availability of accommodation. Many hotels and guesthouses are already operating and catering to local tourists. Some private albergues are doing likewise, others are waiting for restrictions to be eased. Along the Vía private albergues are mostly family owned and they don't need much time to reopen. So, once the restrictions on movement are eased most private albergues should be available, as they were after the initial lockdown in 2020.

The decision to open municipal albergues depends on the local council. If the experience of 2020 is anything to go by it's likely that the majority of municipal albergues will be remaining closed in 2021, although the situation could improve in the second half of the year.

Association or Donativo albergues also mostly remained closed in 2020 and that is likely to be the case this year too, at least until the second half of the year.

Xunta albergues in Galicia have already made the decision to open as soon as there is enough pilgrims to justify it. What this will mean in practice on the Camino Sanabrés remains to be seen. In 2020 some of them opened while others didn't.

Also, once open albergues will be subject to restriction on how many people they can put in a dorm. In 2020 this was 50% capacity. There's talk of it being 30% this year (although this may change, at 50% last year there were zero reports of outbreaks among pilgrims, so it's hard to see the logic in reducing this).

Restrictions on entering Spain

Currently, to enter Spain from another EU country you must have a negative PCR test and fill in the passenger information form. See HERE for details. Plus, whatever conditions are imposed by your own government.

Restrictions from non-EU countries tend to be stricter. Please check the information provided by your own government.

"I've read online that pilgrims are already walking in Galicia". Yes, indeed they are. There are currently (March / April 2021) no provincial movement restrictions in Galicia, so it's legal to move around within Galicia itself. However, the central government is considering imposing provincial movement restrictions until after Easter while at the same time allowing tourists to come into Spain. Go figure, as they say in the US, sometimes it doesn't make much sense. Central and regional governments often disagree on what to do and pull in different directions. On top of that restrictions change locally on a daily basis, regionally every week or two and nationally every week (or thereabouts). So, it's all kinda confusing...

"I've read online that someone is already walking the Via". Yes, there's at least one man, he started from Seville in early March and has been boasting about his exploits on the German language Vía Group on Facebook. He's already broken the law at least once by crossing from Seville province to Badajoz. And since he was in Almadén they've had to go into lockdown again. I won't make any obvious comments on this man's character. Many of us have have received kindness and hospitality from local Camino communities over the years and to see someone being disrespectful to them in this way is sickening. Suffice to say this isn't what the Camino is about and it's up to the rest of us to demonstrate that.

To summarise COVID-19...

The situation seems to be heading in the right direction and based on this and on the experience of 2020 it's not unreasonable to presume that it will be possible to walk Caminos again soon.

However, things remain volatile and there are many factors which could disrupt this.

I will be keeping the information on this site up-to-date and as soon as the provencial borders open I will be contacting albergues to find out what their plans are. This information will be here.

There is a couple of good websites for updates:

- RTVE is the Spanish national broadcaster. Their guide to restrictions is updated daily and covers the whole of Spain. It seems to be the most comprehensive and up-to-date of the different news services. (Spanish only)

- The Our World Data Website brings data together from all over the world and has an easy to use interface for checking trends and doing comparisons. It's a good way to follow the trends without relying on the media.

Other Frequently Asked Questions...

How well marked is the Vía? Are the yellow arrows easy to follow?

The Vía is mostly well marked with yellow arrows and a variety of other "official" signposting. The few places where there is doubt are described in the guide.

If you're bringing a smartphone the app version of the guide includes interactive, offlien maps which make it basically impossible to get lost! You can see the apps here. A new iPhone app is in the pipeline for early 2021.

What are the distances you have to walk every day?

The distances between places with pilgrim accommodation are given in the guide. The longest stretch with no accommodation or amenities of any sort of 29km. There are several places where you will need to be able to walk at least 30km. There is one 39km gap between pilgrim accommodation however this can be broken into two stages by staying at one of the several cheap hotels close to the Camino.

Are there lots of places to eat?

Wherever there is accommodation there is always some place to eat. It may be a bar or a restaurant or the pilgrim hostel may do meals or have a kitchen. At time of writing (2020) there is only one exception to this, Outeiro, where the local bar has closed.

Are there pilgrim menus?

Pilgrim menus are beginning to appear in restaurants along the Vía however they are by no means universally available. That means that restaurants generally serve at Spanish meal times, lunch from 2pm and dinner from 9pm.

I can only manage maximum 20km a day, will I be able to walk the Vía?

With the help of taxis it's possible, but you will need to organise it yourself, so you'll need to speak some Spanish.

Also, on the Vía there are often long gaps (ie. more than 15km) between pilgrim accommodation and amenities of any sort. If you are not able to deal easily with walking these distances while being entirely self-sufficient (ie. carrying enough food and water for the whole stage) then the Vía may not be suitable for you.

Are taxis and public transport easily available?

Local bars generally have the phone numbers for taxis. Public transport is available in some places but by no means everywhere.

This is my first Camino / long-distance hike, is the Vía a good first Camino?

The Vía is not a good place to learn the ins and outs of long distance hiking. There are many things to learn when preparing for and walking a long distance, multi-day hike and you will only really start to learn these things when you start doing it. Things like: what equipment to bring, what footwear, what clothes, how far can I comfortably walk in a day and for how many days can I sustain this pace, how much water should I carry, how much food and what kind of food should I carry, how much weight can I carry comfortably, how hot is too hot, how waterproof is my waterproof clothing, etc., etc., etc.

Many of the questions you'll need to find answers to are personal to you, hearing about other people's experiences may help, but ultimately everybody's experience will be different and you will need to find the answers that suit you. That will only start happening when you start walking.

The Vía de la Plata is an unforgiving environment with few support services for pilgrims (baggage transport, public transport, frequent pilgrim accommodation, etc.). If you get anything wrong in your preparation or in how you organise yourself from day to day (and if it's your first time you WILL get things wrong) it will be up to you to deal with it as well as you can. This may make your Camino a difficult and possibly miserable experience.

If it's your first time you should consider walking the Camino Francés (or one of the other more frequented Caminos) where pilgrim accommodation is far more frequent and support services of every type are widely available.

Can I just walk the last 100km of the Vía?

Of course, starting in Ourense. This will qualify you for a Compostela when you get to Santiago. The usual proviso about getting more than one stamp a day applies.

How much does it cost to walk the Vía de la Plata?

Generally pilgrim hostels are between 10€ and 15€ to sleep. A menu in a bar or restaurant is usually between 10€ and 12€. Coffee is usually about 1.20€, a snack in a bar (bocadillo, tortilla, etc.) is typically between 2€ and 3€. You can lower your costs by buying from shops or supermarkets where they're available. Many places also have hotels and guest houses, typical prices for single rooms is between 20€ and 40€. Add about 50% for a double.

PREPARATION & PLANNING

When is the best time to walk?

Starting in Seville, from a weather point-of-view the best time to start is March / April. However, that is also the busy time. Earlier than that and the chances of encountering bad weather (cold, rain, wind, etc.) are higher. Later than that and the chances of extreme heat are higher.

October is also a good time to start from Seville however as you head north the days will get shorter and the weather will get colder. By the time you get to Galicia and the mountains it'll already be getting towards November and the chances of bad weather (including snow) are high.

There's no reason not to start from Seville in winter (November to February) however you will need good cold weather and rain gear and an all-season sleeping-bag.

If you're starting further north in Salamanca or Zamora, conditions are similar to the Camino Francés. The northern section, north of Salamanca, can be walked at any time of year, with the proviso that some of the mountains are above 1,000m and so weather conditions can be harsh in winter.

When is the worse time to walk?

Starting in Seville the worst and hardest time to walk is the hot months (June, July, August and September). In the south of Spain (ie. Andalusia and Extremadura) daytime temperatures above 35C are normal and temperatures above 40C are common. This extreme heat makes the summer the most difficult and dangerous time to walk - several people have died of heat related causes in recent years. You should not attempt to walk in summer unless you are used to and comfortable walking in 40C and higher.

In addition to the heat you may also find that many pilgrim hostels will be closed for periods over the summer to allow their owners / staff / volunteers to take a holiday. These closures are generally not planned or announced in advance.

Also, unless you really want solitude the loneliness of being along every day and every evening of your walk is likely to take an emotional toll.

If you search around the internet you'll find some accounts of people who've walked in summer. They give advice such as carry a hiking umbrella, carry lots of water, start very early (and walk several hours in the dark), etc. This is all sound advice, but it boils down to one thing, if you take all of the following precautions then the southern section of the Vía in summer is just about bearable. Why would you want to do that when there are lots of other Caminos in northern Spain you could walk instead and have a far more relaxed and enjoyable time?

Climate data

You can see climate information for Seville, Salamance and Santiago de Compostela here:

- Seville

- Salamanca

- Santiago de Compostels

Seville, Salamanca and Santiago have been chosen because their climates are largely representative of the three climate zones the Vía passes through.

How to interprete this climate data on Wikipedia

Temperatures given are air temperatures.

Probably the most indicative and useful figures are the Average high and the Average low.

Record high: the maximum air temperature ever recorded during a calendar month

Mean maximum: average of each year's record high for a calendar month

Average high: average daily maximum temperatures for the entire month

Daily mean: average daily air temperature observed during a calendar month

Average low: average daily minimum temperatures for the entire month

Mean minimum: average of each year's record low for a calendar month

Record low: the minimum air temperature ever recorded during a calendar month

Climate zone map

1. Starting in the south Mediterranian climate (GREEN) - hot dry summers, cool winters with lower temperatures and more rainfall as you move north and at higher altitudes.

2. Mountain climate (BROWN) - cooler in summer and colder in winter than surrounding areas with possibility of snow.

3. In the north you come into an oceanic climate area (BLUES) - strongly influenced by the Gulf Stream which moderates temperature all year round and brings lots of rain.

On this map the Vía is shown as a white line.

Camino de Santiago Vía de la Plata

Copyright (C) Wikipedia.

In Galicia and especially at higher altitudes it is considerably cooler, rainfall is abundant and high winds common. On some mountain passes snow is common in winter, however not generally in quantities which would pose a problem for walkers.

Is there a luggage transfer service along the Vía?

There is no luggage service comparable to those available on the Camino Francés offering a door-to-door luggage transfer service along the whole Vía. Taxi drivers will often be happy to transport luggage but you will need to organise and negotiate that yourself for which you will need a basic level of Spanish. The charges for this are general the same as for transporting a passenger (ie. about 1€ per km - although this is not a fixed price and I've heard many reports of taxi drivers taking pilgrims for a ride and not in the way they wanted).

Can I send things I don't need for the walk ahead to Santiago?

Casa Ivar in Santiago will store luggage while you walk. You just send it to them from any post office. Details from their website

Do I need a sleeping bag on the Vía?

Bringing a sleeping bag is a good idea for several reasons. Some albergues do not provide blankets (and if they do they are very often not clean). Some albergues are not heated.

What kind of sleeping bag depends on the time of year you plan to walk. In summer a two season one is fine (usually recommended for temperatures down to about 8 degrees C). In winter a four season one is recommended (for temperatures down to about freezing).

Some people walk with just a sleeping sheet and swear that it's not a problem, it's a personal choice, obviously some people feel the cold more than other people,

I only have two weeks, what's the best part to walk?

This depends on the time of year. Outside of the hot months you could walk in the south. Seville to Mérida or Cáceres would take about two weeks. It's a nice walk with varied landscape and lots of pretty southern Spanish villages and towns, plus the historic cities of Seville, Mérida and Cáceres. These cities are all easily accessible using public transport.

In summer it's best to avoid the south because of the heat. North of Salamanca conditions are similar to the Camino Francés. Salamanca to Santiago is about 500km and would take most people about twenty days. If you don't have enough time for that you could shorten it by starting in Puebla de Sanabria. From there it's about ten days to Santiago.

Is packing for the Vía different from other Caminos?

Most of the things you'll need on the Vía are the same as for other Caminos. And this changes depending on the time of year you want to walk.

However, when packing for the Vía there is a number of factors to bear in mind which are less significant on other Caminos.

You will need to be able to walk up to 30km while carrying all the water and food you need for the entire day. So you'll need extra space in your backpack for this.

The Vía is about 1,000km south to north with altitudes ranging from sea level to over 1,000m. In this distance it passes through several different climate zones and with the changes in altitude the temperature can change greatly from day to day. This means you'll need to pack clothes which are adaptable to both hot weather and cold weather and for rain.

PILGRIM HOSTELS & OTHER ACCOMMODATION

How many Pilgrim Hostels (Albergues) are there and what are they like?

This information is covered in detail in the guide.

Generally along the Vía it's rare for a place to have more than two pilgrim hostels and many places only have one. That means you often don't have a choice between different hostels (this can be a good thing or a bad thing, depending how you look at it.)

The quality of pilgrim hostels varies greatly. Some are modern, purpose-built businesses with all the comforts you'd expect and a price tag to match. Others are reminicent of the early days of the Camino revival (the 1990s) with basic facilities, no frills and a minimum of house-keeping.

A brief description of each pilgrim hostel is given in the guide.

Is there accommodation like guest houses and hotels?

Most places along the Vía have guest house and / or hotel accommodation. This has been developing nicely during the last few years due to the increase in the number of people walking. The app has links to Booking.com to allow you to book accommodation easily. You can also do this from our online guide.

During busy periods is it necessary / advisable to book ahead?

This really depends on the time of year you're walking and on your own personal preferences. If you're walking from Seville in March / April you may well encounter full hostels. At any time of year if you want to avoid the hassle of having to search around for a place to sleep at the end of a long day's walk then booking ahead may be the option for you. Bear in mind that usually only private hostels accept reservations. Also, it should be enough to book one or two days in advance, you don't need to book your whole Camino before you start walking.

Will there be a lot of other pilgrims? When is the busy time?

Leaving Seville in March / April is the busy period. Outside this time and especially in summer and winter the Vía can be very quiet and if you're walking you may find yourself alone a lot of the time.

CYCLING

I want to do the Vía by bicycle, what do I need to know?

Following the Vía walking route would require a high degree of fitness and strength and an all-terrain bicycle. There are often road-based alternatives which may add some distance but would also be a lot easier for bikes.

At the moment there is no guide in English to cycling the Vía.

Several companies rent bikes and will also organise accommodation, BICIGREEN. Triana Backpackers Hostel in Seville also rents bikes, see HERE.

SAFETY

Is the Vía safe to walk (from the point-of-view of crime)?

Around 2014 there were some incidents of robberies from pilgrims on the stage between Seville and Guillena. The perpetrators were found and convicted. Since then there have been no reported problems of theft.

Spain is a very safe country and violent crime is rare. Problems of theft are mostly concentrated in big cities, areas frequented by tourists and public transport hubs such as railway stations.

Spain's murder rate was 0.62 per 100,000 of population (2018). This compares to The United States 4.96, Canada 1.76, United Kingdom 1.2, Australia 0.89, Ireland 0.87. Source Wikipedia.

Is the Vía safe for women (from the point-of-view of sexual harrassment and violence)?

On the issue of sexual violence. This has been the subject of debate in Spain for many years and beginning with the Zapatero goverment in the early 2000s vigorous efforts have been made to combate violence against women. There are special courts for dealing with these crimes and the police have specially trained units to investiagate and support victims of these crimes. The police, together with the judicary, take incidents of sexual assualt very, very seriously. They have well established procedures for dealing with these incidents in which the wellbeing of the victim is central.

In the spring and early summer of 2019 there was a number of incidents of a man exposing himself to female pilgrims north of Baños de Montemayor. The police and the local council were made aware of this situation and took steps to ensure the safety of pilgrims. Despite this the man continued and escalated his activities until an incident in late May when he sexually assaulted a pilgrim. The police were notified and the victim was interviewed and given psychological support. Based on her discription of the man the police were able to organise an identity parade for the following day from which the victim indentified the perpetrator. He was arrested and placed in custody to appear in court the following day when he was charged with sexual assault. Within days he had appeared in court again under a procedure know as juicio rápido / rapid justice, which is used when it's important to bring a case to a rapid conclusion, such as when the victim is a tourist. He was found guilty and sentenced to prison. The man had a long criminal record, including a conviction for sexual assault on a pilgrim in 2011 and others for crimes of violence (including against the police).

What happened in this case underlines the importance of reporting incidents of sexual harassement to the police (even ones which could be described as trivial). This allows the police to take actions which could prevent a more serious incident involving the same individual.

Is it worth reporting incidents to the Spanish police?

Anyone who tells you it's not worth your trouble reporting things to the police in Spain has clearly never had any dealings with the Spanish police!

The Spanish police are extremely professional and diligent. They take a special interest in crimes involving pilgrims, paritally from a desire to protect Spain's economic interests but also because the Caminos are important to Spain historically and Spanish people take great pride from the fact that many thousands of people travel from all over the world every year to do a pilgrimage in Spain.

The Spanish police's AlterCops app has been recommended by people who've had the need to use it. Despite its silly name it is a quick and easy way of alerting the emergency services of a problem or incident. It also helps them to find you easily - this is especially important when you're going to be spending a long time in remote rural areas.

Read more here.

Are there dangerous animals along the Vía?

There are bears and wolves in Spain, mostly in the mountainous north. However, they are rare and incidents of them causing problems for humans seem to be non existant.

Is extreme weather common along the Vía?

Yes, in summer in the south extreme heat is not uncommon (over 40 degrees C). See the Climate Data section for more details.

BEDBUGS

Is there or has there been problems with bedbugs on the Vía?

No. Or at least, not that I am aware. (Or probably better to add yet.)

COMMUNICATIONS

Do I need to speak Spanish?

No, but some basic knowledge will be a big help. In rural Spain English speakers are pretty rare. A survival Camino Spanish guide is available from here.

Do I need a phone?

Many pilgrim hostels have no permanent staff and post a phone number on the door which you'll need to call if you're the first pilgrim to arrive. For this reason a phone is useful, especially during quiet times of the year. It could also be very useful in the event of an emergency.

Do I need a Spanish SIM card or is WiFi widely available?

Many private hostels and cafés now have WiFi. Whether you need a SIM card or not depends on your own need to be in contact on the internet or by phone. If you need a Spanish SIM one of the best companies for international calls and internet is Lebara. They have lots of pre-paid plans combining internet and international calls.

See the guide for the location of a handy shop in Seville to buy a SIM card. In Spain SIM cards must be registered so you'll need your passport / EU ID card to buy one.

Mobile coverage along the Vía is generally very good with very few places where the network speed drops below 4G.

ASTORGA / CAMINO SANABRES

What are the pros and cons of the two different routes after Granja de Moreuela?

The two options after Granja are the Camino Sanabrés and the branch of the Vía which joins the Camino Francés in Astorga.

The two routes are about the same length.

The Camino Sanabrés has more mountains and fewer pilgrims.

The Camino Francés has more pilgrims and a more developed and dense infrastructure, for these reasons it's the easiest option physically.

SIGHTSEEING

What historic / UNESCO World Heritage sights are there along the Vía?

Briefly (because these are described in the guide): Seville (and the Roman city of Italica in Santiponce), Mérida, Cáceres, Salamanca and Santiago de Compostela.

What are good places to take a rest day?

Any of the UNESCO World Heritage sight cities are worth taking a couple of days to explore properly. Zafra, Galisteo, Zamora and Puebla de Sanabria are also pretty. Besides that there is also a number of places which have natural hot springs, Aljucén, Baños de Montemayor and Ourense are the big ones.

CAMPING

What about camping on the Vía?

There are very few campsites so if you want to camp it'll be wild camping.

Wild camping in Spain is legal in some regions and under certain circumstances.

Generally, you cannot camp within 200m of the sea, close to millitary installations or tourist camp sites, in national parks or in areas around national monuments.

Local people in rural Spain tend to be fairly tolerant of tourists / pilgrims camping. That said, how you're viewed will largely be determined by the respect and common sense you show to the locals, especially when it comes to: obeying any local restrictions (ie. No Camping or Private Property signs), not littering, not lighting fires, not staying more than one night, not bothering farm animals (either yourself or, if you've got a dog, your dog), not camping close to buildings which are in use, and generally anything which is going to worry / annoy people.

The not lighting fires bit is important. Lighting fires is never allowed under any circumstances.

There's good information on this site (scroll down for Spain).

GETTING THERE

How do I get to Seville?

Seville has an airport with flights from around Europe.

There are hourly high-speed train (AVE) connections from Madrid taking about 2h30m, and less frequent ones from Barcelona.

How do I get to Salamanca?

Salamanca has a direct train connection to Madrid taking about 2h45m.

How do I get to Ourense?

Ourense is on the train line linking Santiago de Compostela and Madrid with trains every day in both directions.

The easiest way to get to Ourense is to fly into Santiago and get a train or bus from there. The distance is about 100km.

It's also possible to fly into Madrid and get a train from there. This train journey takes about 5 hours.

Spanish Trains

For more information about using Spanish trains see the Man in Seat 61. I can't really add anything to what he says because he covers everything.



Copyright © Gerald Kelly 2021. All text and photos.